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Engel, Mitchell, Bariatric Surgery. Pershing, The Clinician's Toolbox. Field, Sonneville, Prevention. Devlin, Wonderlich, Walsh, Mitchell, Afterword. Review quote " Devlin, Stephen A.

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Wonderlich, B. Timothy Walsh, James E. Mitchell; from the Foreword "The impressive research, clinical and personal experiences of the authors provide the reader with complementary perspectives on this potentially debilitating eating disorder. The case studies presented through most chapters highlight core clinical issues in a manner that is difficult to do achieve in pure research texts or papers.


  1. A Clinician's Guide to Binge Eating Disorder.
  2. Tracks and Shadows: Field Biology as Art.
  3. No Joy.
  4. Questions and Answers about Binge Eating Disorder: A Guide for Clinicians.

It has been written with the clinician firmly in mind, who will benefit from using this text irrespective of whether they are a novice therapist eager to learn more about BED, or a highly experienced clinician keeping up-to-date with current understanding and treatment approaches. About June Alexander June Alexander is an Australian writer and journalist with a particular focus on eating disorders.

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The relationships among negative emotion, cognitions regarding control or lack thereof, and actual and perceived amount consumed have yet to be fully elucidated. An important question for both BED and Bn is whether the two defining features of an eating binge, i. For both disorders, it has been suggested that people who report only subjective eating binges, i.

Despite this resemblance, it is possible that, particularly for people with BED who do not engage in compensatory behaviors, the outcome of recurrent objective binge eating may differ from that of subjective binge eating; specifically, objective binge eating may be more conducive to weight gain.

A Clinician’s Guide to Binge Eating Disorder

The complexities of assessment are ably reviewed in Chapter 9, and, upon careful review of the various methodologies that have been developed, it is clear that all have their limitations. It is apparent that, like the blind men and the elephant, only through ongoing study from a variety of vantage points, making use of different self-report, interview, laboratory, EMA, and perhaps other measures yet to be developed, will we be able to come to a full and accurate understanding of the nature and experience of the eating binge. Another important question regarding BED concerns its relationship with obesity, reviewed in Chapter 1.

Although obesity is not a criterion for the BED diagnosis, BED and obesity are often grouped together in the minds of patients and professionals alike, raising questions regarding the centrality of obesity or the potential for obesity in the diagnostic construct. For patients with both BED and obesity, the nature of the causal associations, if any, are unclear. It is also possible that the genetic and environmental risk factors see Chapter 3 that contribute to the risk for obesity and BED may be partially but not fully overlapping.

During the past two decades, along with defining the central features of BED and developing reliable methods to assess these features, we have begun to learn about additional characteristics of those who suffer from this disorder. Given the intense and varied cultural meanings of food and body size and shape, it is not surprising that ethnicity and race may influence the risk for and particular expression of BED.

These factors, including their interaction with age, gender, socioeconomic status, and other demographic features, are comprehensively presented in Chapter 2. The multifaceted concept of body image disturbance is explored in Chapter 6, including its behavioral, perceptual, cognitive, and emotional components. While a great deal is known about the many characteristics of BED, including behavioral, psychological, and medical dimensions, much less is known regarding its etiology and pathophysiology.

A Clinician's Guide to Binge Eating Disorder by June Alexander

The genetic and environmental contributions to BED, including heritability estimates, candidate genes, environmental risks, and gene-environment interactions, are summarized and discussed in Chapter 3. A particular and most unfortunate environmental factor that influences risk, not only for BED but also for a variety of disorders, is the experience of childhood trauma. As important as questions regarding diagnostic features and etiology of BED may be, the most immediately compelling questions, particularly for those who suffer from BED, involve treatment.

Chapters in section two consistently and effectively highlight the bridge between research and clinical practice, by presenting a range of treatments for BED. A succinct overview of the skills and tools needed for appropriate screening, assessment and diagnosis of BED is presented. A discussion of the frameworks of CBT and interpersonal psychotherapy IPT applied to BED are reviewed, alongside a review of controlled treatment trials of pharmacotherapy.

Limitations of pharmacologic treatments are discussed in an accessible style. Both topics present salient information for any clinician working in this area. A thought-provoking chapter highlights the necessity for prevention-based interventions with adolescents, aimed at targeting both BED and obesity, through targeting pathways such as early-onset dieting; followed by a section outlining the personal costs of BED, the importance of reducing stigma, and future directions for prevention, treatment and recovery.

Finally the book finishes with a chapter that highlights the responsibility of clinicians to harness effective, evidence-based treatments that support, educate and treat individuals with BED. It repeats a core theme presented in many chapters throughout the book: to effectively treat BED we must continue to understand, conceptualise and treat it as a discreet mental health disorder, and bring it into public understanding in the same way anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa have been, rather than grouping individuals with BED with those seeking treatment for obesity and weight loss.

In the afterword, the importance of advocacy and collaboration at a community, clinical and research level is discussed.


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  • Questions and Answers About Binge Eating Disorder: A Guide for Clinicians Interview;
  • A Clinician's Guide to Binge Eating Disorder.
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  • I found the afterword to be particularly thought-provoking and it highlighted just how important the recognition of the BED diagnosis has been at many levels in the community. In summary, this text provides clinicians with a broad, evidence-based framework that offers a map for various treatment approaches, depending on the background of the reader, as well as a sound overview of current research, including gaps in the literature that require further exploration.

    In reading this book I was impressed with how extensive the existing body of research is, and how quickly it is advancing, given the relatively short period of time since the inclusion of BED as a provisional diagnosis in the DSM-IV-TR. I found this book to be thought-provoking, insightful and well-written. The impressive research, clinical and personal experiences of the authors provide the reader with complementary perspectives on this potentially debilitating eating disorder.

    The case studies presented through most chapters highlight core clinical issues in a manner that is difficult to do achieve in pure research texts or papers. It has been written with the clinician firmly in mind, who will benefit from using this text irrespective of whether they are a novice therapist eager to learn more about BED, or a highly experienced clinician keeping up-to-date with current understanding and treatment approaches. Brooke specialises in the inpatient and outpatient treatment of eating disorders, with a special research interest in Binge Eating Disorder.